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November 8, 2016 — California General Election
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MayorCity of BerkeleyNovember 8, 2016California General Election

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November 8, 2016California General Election

City of BerkeleyMayor

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Election Results

  • 100% of precincts reporting (108/108).

About this office

Approves or vetoes city council actions, recommends measures to the city council, and appoints various municipal officers.
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Berkeley City Councilmember
29,499 votes (50.3%)Winning
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  • Expanding Affordable Housing and Raising the Minimum Wage
  • Smart Solutions on Homelessness and Public Safety
  • Strengthening our Public Schools
Profession:Berkeley City Councilmember
Legislative Assistant, Berkeley City Council (20072008)
Member, Zoning Adjustments Board — Appointed position (20062008)
Chair, Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board — Elected position (20042008)
Commissioner, Housing Advisory Commission — Appointed position (20042008)
Commissioner, Planning Commission — Appointed position (20082008)

Berkeley City Councilmember Jesse Arreguin has spent his entire life and career fighting for the values we share and delivering results.

A Progressive Leader from the Start. 

The son and grandson of farmworkers, Jesse Arreguin was born in Fresno and raised in San Francisco. Jesse grew up in a working-class household, where his parents instilled the values of hard work, public service, and giving back to others. When Jesse was young, his family was pushed out of their home in the midst of San Francisco’s skyrocketing housing market, due to owner-move-in evictions and rent increases. Jesse knows how disruptive and harmful evictions are to working families, and how essential housing security is for the success of families and children.

Jesse was motivated by the social movements of the era: the fight against apartheid in South Africa, for democracy in China, and for farmworkers’ rights in California and across the nation. Experiencing these social movements at a very early age helped Jesse develop a lifelong commitment to fighting for social justice.

As a youth, Jesse was also inspired by the life and leadership of Cesar Chavez, who taught him that one person, despite all odds, can stand up and make a difference. Chavez became a hero for Jesse, and at the age of 9, Jesse helped lead efforts to establish Cesar Chavez Street in San Francisco.

He’s been at it ever since, and for the past twenty years Jesse Arreguin has been an effective leader on the critical progressive issues we care about.

The First in His Family to Go to College, Here at Cal.

Jesse’s dream as a kid was to attend the best public university in the world, UC Berkeley. When first visiting the campus, he fell in love with the city and knew this was where he was meant to be. Despite the odds he faced, Jesse became the first in his family to graduate college.

At UC Berkeley, Jesse led efforts to increase student housing and invest in sustainable transportation, and he fought for the interests of students in City Hall as the ASUC City Affairs Director.

After graduation, Jesse decided to make Berkeley his permanent home and dedicated his career to serving the city. He loves Berkeley for its vibrancy and visionary people, incredible cultural and intellectual life, diverse neighborhoods, and history of progressive, trailblazing leadership. 

14 Years of Service to Berkeley, Currently Representing Our Vibrant Downtown on the City Council. 

For the last 14 years, Jesse Arreguin has served the Berkeley community.

Jesse first served on the city’s Housing Advisory Commission, where he helped secure funding for hundreds of new affordable units, helped craft Berkeley’s Condominium Conversion Ordinance, strengthened inclusionary housing policies, and fought for City funding for student cooperative housing.

In 2004, Jesse was elected citywide to serve on the Rent Stabilization Board. As Chair of the Rent Board, he strengthened renter protections to help keep families in their homes.

Jesse also served on numerous other Boards and Commissions, including the Zoning Adjustments Board, Planning Commission, Joint Density Bonus Subcommittee, and on the Downtown Area Plan Advisory Committee, where he helped write our Downtown Plan. He is also a former Boardmember for the local Sierra Club, and worked as a Legislative Aide to a Berkeley City Councilmember.

In 2008, longtime Berkeley City Councilmember Dona Spring passed away. Before her death, she asked Jesse to run to succeed her in office, so Jesse did, and he won. That year Jesse became the youngest person and first Latino ever elected to the Berkeley City Council. For the past 8 years, Councilmember Arreguin has represented our vibrant Downtown and portions of North Berkeley.

Authored and Passed Over 300 Laws on the City Council that Have Made a Difference. 

On the City Council, Jesse Arreguin has been an effective consensus builder. He has helped move the City away from polarization, working constructively with his colleagues, local business, and community leaders to advance practical, forward-thinking solutions on pressing city issues.

Councilmember Arreguin has one of the most effective records on the Council, having drafted and passed over 300 pieces of progressive legislation that have made a real difference for us. Councilmember Arreguin has expanded affordable housing throughout Berkeley, helped establish our minimum wage, protected our environment, co-wrote our Downtown Plan to revitalize the heart of our city, saved our historic Main Post Office, balanced eight city budgets, and fought for tenants, immigrants, and our civil liberties.

Real Progressive Leadership for a Berkeley that Works for Everyone.

Now Jesse Arreguin is running for Mayor to make Berkeley work better for everyone and to carry on this city’s great history of progressive leadership. Jesse is the only candidate for Mayor with a truly progressive vision and a record to back it up.

As Mayor, Jesse Arreguin will tackle the affordability crisis to keep our city diverse and vibrant, take on disparities in health, housing, economic, and educational opportunity, raise the minimum wage to a living wage, make our city more environmentally sustainable, address homelessness through innovative solutions, and responsibly manage our budget.

Berkeley is a progressive city, and we need a progressive Mayor who will work hard and get real results for us. If not in Berkeley, then where?

Jesse Arreguin. Progressive. Effective. Berkeley’s Kind of Mayor.

  • U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders
  • Alameda County Democratic Party
  • Sierra Club
  • California State Controller Betty Yee
  • Alameda Labor Council, AFL-CIO
  • East Bay Express
  • East Bay Times
  • Cal Berkeley Democrats
1.
Question 1

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?

No answer provided.
2.
Question 2

What do you consider the most important issue facing the city?

Answer from Jesse Arreguin:

Berkeley is at a crossroads. We are feeling the effects of the not only national wealth inequities, but also the regional housing crisis. Home prices and rents continue to skyrocket, making Berkeley one of the most expensive cities in the Bay Area.

A 2011 article by the Bay Citizen, based on 2010 census figures, found that Berkeley has one of the biggest wealth gaps in the Bay Area. As housing costs continue to increase, many long-term Berkeley homeowners, prospective homeowners, and renters are vulnerable to being priced out or forced out. Additionally, there is pressure by real estate speculators to tear down older rent-controlled housing to build newer, higher end units, which are exempt from rent control.

Rents are becoming more unaffordable for a growing segment of our population. New construction has not resulted in lower rents, but in luxury housing that does not meet the needs of existing Berkeley workers or residents, especially working families. Instead, this new housing is targeted more towards tech workers who may not be able to afford to live in San Francisco.

This housing crisis has had a direct effect on the population of our city, resulting in an exodus of working families, in particular African-American residents. Our diversity is part of what makes Berkeley such a special place to live. Unless we increase affordable housing, then we will continue to lose our economic and cultural diversity and we won’t be able to recognize the city that we live in.

Throughout his 14 years of public service in Berkeley, Councilmember Jesse Arreguin has been a leading advocate for affordable housing. As Mayor, he will continue to work tirelessly to ensure and expand sustainable, fair, and affordable housing for Berkeley.

Jesse will:

  • Increase the construction of housing along major transit corridors, such as Telegraph Ave., University Ave., and San Pablo Ave. We need to increase our housing supply.
  • Remove further obstacles to the construction of Accessory Dwelling Units under 750 square feet in Berkeley’s residential neighborhoods.
  • Create a Small Sites Program to help non-profit developers buy existing multi-unit buildings to preserve affordability.
  • Implement a Neighborhood Preference policy for inclusionary housing, in which displaced tenants receive preference for new affordable units.
  • Establish a Tenant Harassment Ordinance to provide increased protections for renters facing landlord harassment.
  • Increase funding to construct new housing affordable to low and middle income households.
  • Work with State leaders and UC officials to increase student housing construction, to address the shortage of housing for UC Berkeley students.
  • Work closely with Mayors from other East Bay cities to lobby the State to increase Affordable Housing Tax Credits and other affordable housing funding.
  • Advocate for the State to reform or repeal the Costa-Hawkins Law, which has led to a dysfunctional housing market and rent stabilization turnover.
  • Protect rent control and strengthen tenant protections to prevent displacement.
  • Ensure new housing provides a mix of options for people at different income levels, and increase inclusionary requirements to require a greater percentage of units for low-income households.
3.
Question 3

How do you plan to balance the regional Planned Bay Area (ABAG/MTC) goals of Priority Development Areas (PDAs) with local needs of property owners, traffic/parking/congestion problems, and other local concerns?

No answer provided.
4.
Question 4

Considering the disintegration of local infrastructure, how can the city upgrade to meet the current regulatory requirements for clean air and for clean water discharge into the Bay?

No answer provided.

Vision for a Better Berkeley

Summary
Jesse Arreguin’s Vision for a Berkeley that Works for Everyone

Jesse Arreguin Will Tackle the Affordability Crisis, to Keep Berkeley Vibrant and Diverse

Berkeley is at a crossroads. We are feeling the effects of the not only national wealth inequities, but also the regional housing crisis. Home prices and rents continue to skyrocket, making Berkeley one of the most expensive cities in the Bay Area.

Rents are becoming more unaffordable for a growing segment of our population. New construction has not resulted in lower rents, but in luxury housing that does not meet the needs of existing Berkeley workers or residents, especially working families. Instead, this new housing is targeted more towards tech workers who may not be able to afford to live in San Francisco.

Throughout his 14 years of public service in Berkeley, Councilmember Jesse Arreguin has been a leading advocate for affordable housing. As Mayor, he will continue to work tirelessly to ensure and expand sustainable, fair, and affordable housing for Berkeley.

Jesse will:

  • Increase the construction of housing along major transit corridors, such as Telegraph Ave., University Ave., and San Pablo Ave. We need to increase our housing supply.
  • Remove further obstacles to the construction of Accessory Dwelling Units under 750 square feet in Berkeley’s residential neighborhoods.
  • Create a Small Sites Program to help non-profit developers buy existing multi-unit buildings to preserve affordability.
  • Implement a Neighborhood Preference policy for inclusionary housing, in which displaced tenants receive preference for new affordable units.
  • Establish a Tenant Harassment Ordinance to provide increased protections for renters facing landlord harassment.
  • Increase funding to construct new housing affordable to low and middle income households.
  • Work with State leaders and UC officials to increase student housing construction, to address the shortage of housing for UC Berkeley students.
  • Work closely with Mayors from other East Bay cities to lobby the State to increase Affordable Housing Tax Credits and other affordable housing funding.
  • Advocate for the State to reform or repeal the Costa-Hawkins Law, which has led to a dysfunctional housing market and rent stabilization turnover.
  • Protect rent control and strengthen tenant protections to prevent displacement.
  • Ensure new housing provides a mix of options for people at different income levels, and increase inclusionary requirements to require a greater percentage of units for low-income households.

Jesse Arreguin Will Fight to Raise the Minimum Wage to a Living Wage

On the City Council, Jesse Arreguin helped establish Berkeley’s current minimum wage, but he won’t stop fighting until it’s raised to a living wage.

  • As Mayor, Jesse will work with the City Council, labor, and the business community to create a pathway to a living wage.
  • Jesse will also work with Mayors and City Councilmembers in other East Bay cities to create a regional minimum wage standard.

Jesse Arreguin Will Take on Homelessness Through Comprehensive and Innovative Solutions

Berkeley is facing a homelessness crisis, with over 1,000 people currently living on Berkeley’s streets. The debate around homelessness in our city is nothing new. Some in Berkeley seem to believe we need to address the homeless issue with a one- dimensional, criminalization approach. Their proposals are, in Jesse’s view, redundant, unworkable, and could in fact make the problem worse.

Political posturing and single-minded proposals won’t solve the homeless crisis. That’s why Jesse Arreguin convened a Homeless Task Force to identify solutions. As Mayor, Jesse will put a comprehensive plan into action:

  • Prioritize smart enforcement strategies: Empower our police and their crisis intervention teams with better training and the resources they need to proactively enforce laws.
  • Expand mental health services and outreach.
  • Increase the amount of warming shelters and shelter beds to get people off the streets.
  • Expand storage facilities and safe public restroom access.
  • Improve services for homeless youth.
  • Move forward with a groundbreaking project to provide affordable housing for our homeless on the City’s Berkeley Way Parking Lot.
  • Fully implement the new Homeless Coordinated Entry system, “the Hub," which centralizes homeless services.
  • Explore tiny homes as a transitional housing model for our homeless.

Jesse Arreguin Will Work Tirelessly to Improve Public Safety and Increase Disaster Preparedness

Berkeley has seen an increase in crime in the past year, including several shootings in South and West Berkeley. While property and violent crime has increased, there are not enough officers to effectively patrol our entire city. In addition, 35% of police calls are related to mental health, which diverts police resources. Our firefighters are also seeing an increase in calls, and Berkeley has now started using a 4th ambulance in its fleet, with the need for an additional ambulance growing. Berkeley also straddles the Hayward Fault, and is susceptible to urban wildfires.

As Mayor, Jesse will work closely with our Berkeley Police and Fire Departments to make our neighborhoods safer, and he will work to improve the relationship between our community and our police. He will:

  • Expand emergency mental health services so that police resources are focused on fighting crime.
  • Advocate for hiring more police officers and establish foot patrols in high crime areas.
  • Implement body cameras and dashboard cameras to ensure civilian rights and accountability for our police officers.
  • Reform Berkeley’s police review system to conform to 21st century practices of police oversight.

As Mayor, Jesse Arreguin will also ensure Berkeley takes a more proactive approach to disaster preparedness, to make sure our city is ready. He will:

  • Secure sustainable funding, including from UC, for an additional ambulance.
  • Ensure Berkeley’s various public safety departments continue to upgrade.
  • Increase coordination and communication with our regional mutual aid partners.
  • Fight to prevent the closure of Alta Bates Hospital, which would put thousands of residents at risk during a disaster.
  • Make sure Berkeley’s shelters are retrofitted for earthquake safety.
  • Promote the undergrounding of our city’s power lines.

Jesse Arreguin Will Continue Berkeley’s Long Tradition of Environmental Leadership 

Berkeley has long been a leader in environmental sustainability. As Mayor, Jesse Arreguin will keep Berkeley on the forefront of environmental innovation in California. Jesse will:

  • Advocate for the creation of housing along transit and close to where most people in Berkeley work, to reduce vehicle usage and carbon emissions. Developments in transit-rich areas should meet lower parking requirements than residential neighborhoods.
  • Push for the creation of a locally controlled energy provider, generating power from renewable resources so we can reduce our carbon footprint and create good local green jobs.
  • Expand access to urban agriculture throughout Berkeley by reducing permitting barriers.
  • Develop a Berkeley Deep Green Buildings initiative to promote zero net energy buildings, energy efficiency, and water conservation, and reduce the use of toxic materials in construction.
  • Promote solarization of City buildings, and push for mandatory solar on all large construction projects.
  • Establish a recycling collection fee to fund Berkeley’s recycling program.
  • Push to adopt strong bicycle parking requirements for new residential construction and require Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measures to reduce vehicle trips and carbon emissions.
  • Work to create robust alternatives to driving to reduce carbon emissions by:
    • Adopting a Transportation Services Fee for new development projects to mitigate their transportation/greenhouse gas impacts. This could result in millions of funding for alternative transportation.
    • Limiting the amount of parking developments in transit-rich areas.
    • Expanding bicycle infrastructure by designating more bicycle boulevards, creating protected bicycle lanes to improve bike safety, and installing more bike parking.
    • Expanding electric vehicle infrastructure.
    • Creating transit incentives for employees and residents, such as Eco-Passes.
    • Expanding bus transit and improving the reliability of public transit, including improving bus lines 6 and 51B, and restoring rapid service buses between Berkeley and Oakland.

Jesse Arreguin Will Fight to Give All Berkeley Students the Chance at a World-Class Public Education

Berkeley has some of the best public schools in the state, but there is a growing achievement gap at all levels based on race and income. We need to close the opportunity gap for all students.

As Mayor, Jesse will:

  • Champion a universal pre-school program for Berkeley families.
  • Strengthen the partnership with our School District to advance the 2020 Vision.
  • Work with BUSD to expand classroom facilities and explore creating a new school to address growing enrollment.
  • Expand summer camp programs and recreation opportunities for all youth.

Jesse Arreguin Will Responsibly Manage Our Budget, While Making Sure City Services are Equitably Distributed

The City of Berkeley is known for its high quality City services. However, Berkeley is behind other communities in embracing technology to better deliver services and connect with residents. Of course there are areas, such as the permitting process, where customer service improvements are needed. In addition, some parts of Berkeley have historically been underserved. Berkeley also faces over $1 billion in unfunded capital needs and employee retirement liabilities. As Mayor, Jesse will ensure we improve the delivery of City services and that resources are equitability distributed citywide. He will also work to ensure a sustainable future for our city Budget.

As Mayor, Jesse will:

  • Work to improve our aging infrastructure and public facilities.
  • Protect our safety net and improve essential services for the homeless, seniors, the disabled, children and youth, and other vulnerable populations.
  • Develop a long-term Fiscal Action Plan to address growing unfunded liabilities.
  • Pursue funding sources to support strong public services such as:
    • Promoting a Shop Berkeley First policy to support local business and increase City revenue.
    • Taxing temporary lodging like AirBnb through the Transient Occupancy Tax.
    • Increasing the City's outreach to secure more grant opportunities.

Jesse Arreguin Will Fight to Save Our Community Hospital, Alta Bates

As Mayor, Jesse will work with unions, community organizations, and key stakeholders to develop a coalition to fight the closure of Alta Bates Hospital.

Berkeley has a responsibility to protect the health and welfare of our residents, and ensure that emergency and urgent care services are readily available, so that people can get the care they need and reduce the risk of lives lost.

Already, the extended commute to Summit for heart attack patients puts people’s lives at risk. The closure of an emergency unit at Alta Bates and transferring of all other health care services to Summit in Oakland will put people’s lives at risk even further. We must do everything we can to keep emergency, urgent, and intensive care services in our community.

And he will push to explore using the City’s land use and public health authority and other various legal powers available to the City to protect against this dangerous hospital closure.

Jesse Arreguin Will Improve Berkeley’s Roads, Parks, and Community Facilities

Berkeley can be a world-class city. However, years of deferred maintenance has resulted in our streets, sidewalks, parks, and community facilities needing significant repair. As Mayor, Jesse will:

  • Work to increase funding to fix streets throughout Berkeley. Despite the passage of Measure M in 2012 there are still $30 million in additional resources needed to repair Berkeley’s most in-need streets.
  • Repair sidewalks throughout Berkeley and implement pedestrian safety improvements.
  • Prioritize implementation of the new Bike Plan to expand bike lanes and bicycle parking, and make streets safer for cyclists.
  • Improve our senior centers and emergency shelter sites, and push to make Cragmont School a designated shelter site.
  • Invest in our parks and explore expanding open space throughout Berkeley to meet the recreation needs of our growing population.
  • Develop a plan to fix Old City Hall and the Veterans Memorial Building and revitalize our Civic Center.
  • Expand watershed projects throughout Berkeley to reduce flooding and runoff.
  • If Measure T1 passes, Jesse will work to ensure funding is allocated to sufficiently address a variety of infrastructure needs with citizen input.
— October 25, 2016 Arreguin for Mayor
Berkeley City Councilmember, District 5
19,401 votes (33.1%)
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  • Housing affordable for low income and moderate income residents, in the downtown and major corridors linked to transit
  • Healthy children and families: income equality, universal preschool, access to quality education, park iimprovements and public safety
  • Vibrant and green downtown and commercial corridors: economic development, community open space, safe access for bikes and pedestrians.
Profession:Berkeley City Councilmember
City Council Member District 5, Berkeley City Council — Elected position (2004current)
Board Member, City of Berkeley Zoning Adjustments Board — Appointed position (20002004)
Commissioner, City of Berkeley Planning Commission — Appointed position (19962000)
UC Berkeley Bachelor of Arts, Political Science (1968)
Commissioner, Alameda County Transportation Commission (2011current)
Boardmember, The Berkeley Public Schools Fund (19912016)

 

 

 

Born in Berkeley, I am the first son of Annette and George Capitelli.  My father was an Italian immigrant who struggled to find his place in this country.  I learned from my father the values of hard work, respect and community.  

I attended John Muir Elementary School as a young child, moved away, and returned to Berkeley in the 1960’s to attend Cal, majoring in political science.  I married my college sweetheart Marilyn in 1968.  We bought a house on Sonoma Ave, had two children - Sarah and Matthew -  both of whom attended Berkeley public schools.  I am now the proud grandfather of four grandchildren, one of whom attends Jefferson Elementary, the other to attend next fall.

As a teacher in an east bay high school - my first career - I learned how critically important equitable educational opportunities are for all kids.  My eight years in the classroom transformed me into a lifelong advocate for public schools and our hardworking teachers, and years later inspired me to join the Berkeley Public Schools Fund board.  I am proud to say that for over 25 years my board colleagues and I have raised millions of dollars for public school projects and direct classroom assistance.

Most of my adult working life has been spent as a realtor helping people buy their homes in Berkeley.  I am honored to have had the opportunity to help facilitate what is for many the most important purchase they ever make, providing security for their families and an investment in their community.   

For many years Marilyn co-owned Avenue Books in the Elmwood.  In 1991 when we learned that the Elmwood Theater might close and be demolished, I rallied several neighbors and theater supporters to establish a nonprofit in order to buy and save the theater.  We did it!  It is still showing films and continues to be the iconic anchor establishment of the neighborhood.

In the late 1990’s I started my life in public service by accepting an appointment to the Planning Commission.  I served there for four years, then served four years on the Zoning Adjustments Board.  As a commissioner I learned how careful and thoughtful city planning can improve people’s lives, stimulate our local economy, and enable us all to move towards more sustainable lifestyles.

In 2004 I ran for City Council and have since represented District 5, the north Berkeley district that includes North Shattuck and Solano Avenue.  These, like all Berkeley’s neighborhood shopping areas, are an important part of our economy, but also critical to our sense of neighborhood and community identity.  I’m proud to say that during my tenure I spearheaded traffic safety efforts, bulb-outs to use for community spaces, dozens of new trees and landscaping, and carefully negotiated with Safeway so that the impacts to the neighborhood of their Shattuck remodel would be minimal.  I also developed Berkeley’s pilot parklet program.   You can see examples in front of Saul's, the Cheeseboard and coming soon: Pegasus Books on Solano Ave.

In 2008, as my Council responsibilities became the central focus of my life, I stepped away from my active work as a realtor and business manager.  The next year I had an opportunity to collaborate with the neighborhood group “Friends of King Park” to complete major park improvements including a new climbing structure.  I also participated in Vision 2020 focusing on kids aged 0 to 5 years.  The research was clear: the achievement gap evident in our schools starts when children are young – before they even begin kindergarten. I am committed to ensuring every child has the opportunity to succeed, which is why I support universal preschool and a healthy start for all children.   

In 2014, I gathered together a broad coalition of community members and elected officials to take on BIG Soda. Measure D passed with over 75% of the vote, making Berkeley the first city in the nation to pass a sugar-sweetened beverage tax!  In its first year the tax brought in over $1.5 million for children’s nutrition programs and the schools’ gardening programs. With the success of the Berkeley Measure, many cities across the nation are looking to us to achieve similar results.  I have consulted with Philadelphia, Oakland, Albany, and Boulder, Colorado. 

I am proud of my accomplishments made through my service to our community, our kids, and Berkeley’s future. I am honored to run for Mayor -  to continue this important work, but more importantly, to find new and innovative ways to create a vibrant and successful city we all call home.

 

 

 

  • League of Conservation Voters of the East Bay
  • Robert Reich, UC Professor and Former Secretary of Labor
  • The Berkeley Democratic Club
  • Tom Bates, Mayor City of Berkeley
  • Loni Hancock, California State Senator
  • Nancy Skinner, Former Assemblymember
  • East Bay Forward
  • Berkeley Police Association
  • Berkeley Firefighters IAFF Local 1277
  • The Alameda County Building Trades Council
  • Carole Kennerly, Former Vice Mayor, City of Berkeley
  • Karen Chapple, Professor, UC Berkeley
  • Susan Medak, Managing Director, Berkeley Repertory Theater
  • Xavier Morales, Co-Chair, Latinos Unidos de Berkeley
  • Dave Campbell, Advocacy Director, Bike East Bay
  • Markos Moulitsas Zuniga, Founder, Daily Kos
  • Malcolm Margolin, Former Publisher, Heyday Press
  • Michael Lewis, Author
  • Michele Lawrence, Former Superintendent of Berkeley Schools

A city’s government should represent the range of its citizenry and reflect the diversity of voices, communities, and ideals embodied within it.  It should be responsive to, and reflect the needs of its residents.  Decisions should be made in a collaborative manner based upon objective evidence and community input.  Annual budgets should be balanced and an adequate financial reserve in place for emergencies.

 

The priorities of municipal government should be to:

  • Insure public safety, including crime prevention, disaster preparedness and fire safety.

  • Provide systems, infrastructure and services that maintain public health.

  • Provide equitable educational opportunities for its children.

  • Identify and provide resources for those in need including affordable housing, and health and social services.

  • Provide and maintain infrastructure that improves citizens’ quality of life including parks, libraries and community centers.

  • Provide and maintain infrastructure that facilitates safe transit, including streets, sidewalks, bike lanes, buses and rapid transit.

  • Promote policies that provide jobs and financial stability for workers.

  • Encourage economic development that provides local jobs, commercial resources, community centers and a broad tax base.

Coordinate when necessary with regional partners to address challenges that cross city and county borders.

— October 7, 2016 Laurie Capitelli for Berkeley Mayor 2016 Campaign

Xavier Morales, Co-Director of Latinos Unidos, worked closely with Laurie in the passage of the first in the nation Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax in Berkeley. To learn more about Laurie Capitelli and his run for Mayor of Berkeley visit: http://www.laurieforberkeleymayor.com/

Vicki Alexander, former Health Officer of the City of Berkeley, has worked with Laurie for years to address resources for children 0 to 5 throughout Berkeley. To learn more about Laurie Capitelli and his run for Mayor of Berkeley visit: http://www.laurieforberkeleymayor.com/

 
— October 7, 2016 Laurie Capitelli for Berkeley Mayor 2016 campaign

Lori Droste Supports Laurie Capitelli for Berkeley Mayor. They have worked tirelessly to address the housing crisis and address the need to build more affordable housing. 

— October 7, 2016 Laurie Capitelli for Berkeley Mayor 2016 campaign

 

Charles O'Neil and Laurie Capitelli have worked together on a number of projects, including his most recent and biggest venture yet- Books in the Shop. This program makes books for all ages accessible to kids throughout the East Bay. To learn more about Laurie and his run for Berkeley Mayor visit:http://www.laurieforberkeleymayor.com/

— October 7, 2016 Laurie Capitelli for Berkeley Mayor 2016 campaign

 

Kristen Collins, Former Teacher and Retired Principal of Berkeley Arts Magnet Elementary School, talks about Laurie's involvement in addressing education and his work with the Berkeley Public Schools Fund. Learn more about Laurie Capitelli and his run for Mayor by visiting:http://www.laurieforberkeleymayor.com/

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Kriss Worthington

Berkeley City Councilmember
5,299 votes (9%)
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Email kriss@krissworthington.com
Graduate Student
2,295 votes (3.9%)
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  • Tackling the housing shortage and affordability crisis
  • Reinvesting in public parks & infrastructure
  • Expanding our leadership in environmental sustainability
Profession:Graduate Student
Chair, Community Environmental Advisory Commission — Appointed position (2016current)
Member, Community Environmental Advisory Commission — Appointed position (2014current)
Member, Zoning Adjustment Board — Appointed position (20162016)
Research Intern, The International Council for Clean Transportation (20152015)
Research Associate, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (20132014)
UC Berkeley M.S., Environmental Engineering (current)
UC Berkeley Master of Public Policy (current)
UC San Diego B.S., Biology (2013)
Delegate, UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly (20152016)
President and Co-Founder, Engineers for a Sustainable World at Berkeley (20142016)
  • Lori Droste, Berkeley City Councilmember (endorsing for second place)
  • Susan Wengraf, Berkeley City Councilmember (endorsing for second place)
  • Alfred Twu, Zero Waste Commission chair
  • Liz Varnhagen, Community Environmental Advisory Commissioner
  • Victoria Q. Legg, Disaster and Fire Safety Commissioner
  • Kelly Jiang, Energy Commissioner
  • Diego Aguilar-Canabal, Housing Advisory Commissioner
  • Sonja Trauss, Founder of the SF Bay Area Renter's Federation
  • Jonathan Morris, External Affairs Vice President, UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly
  • Dax Vivid, Campus Affairs Vice President, UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly
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Zachary Runningwolf

Indigenous Elder
2,051 votes (3.5%)
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Email runningwolf.zachary@yahoo.com
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Bernt Rainer Wahl

Scientist/Entrepreneur/Professor
0 votes (2.9%)
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Community Volunteer
0 votes (1.6%)
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  • Good Government is a responsive government this is why I embrace an open door policy. Your e mails and phone calls will be answered
  • Public Safety overall crime rate is 59% higher then the national average
  • Fiscal responsibility The city is one billion dollars in debt and must be corrected immediatly
Profession:community volunteer
retirerd construction worker small business owner, self (2000current)
Organizer, First They Came For The Homeless (2015current)
Member at large, Friends of Adeline (2016current)
Member at large, Berkeley Tenets Union (2016current)
Member at large, Berkeley Progressive Aliance (2016current)

The 1960’s were tumultuous times. A time of hope and anger. A time of dreams and desperation shattered by water hoses, billy clubs, tear gas and needless deaths. It was in this era that I grew up in

 

My name is Michael Lee and it my immense pleasure to be your candidate for the Mayor of Berkeley in November 2016. I am a first generation American , my father is Korean and my mother is from the Philippines, my grandparents lived in Hawaii and were non- english speaking immigrants from Korea. They subsequently pulled themselves up by their bootstraps and put nine kids through college.

 

At age 11 I was one of the youngest members of the anti-war group Student Mobilization Committed Against the War. One of my earliest lessons was that its important to always do the right thing no matter what the consequences are. Defense of the community and to serve it is what my life has been and currently is.

 

Over the years I have been associated with Industrial Workers of the World, the Central American Solidarity Movement,  Irish Northern Aid Committee Irish Republican Socialist Party. In 1985 I was elected the President of the San Francisco Union of the Homeless. Based on my effectiveness, I was subsequently assigned to the Organizing Team of The National Union of the Homeless.

 

In 1992 due to my adamant defense of People’s Park I became one of the Four named defendants in a SLAPP suit filed by the University of Berkeley.

 

For some time now I along with Mike Zint, First They Came For The Homeless, Berkeley Post Office Defenders and concerned citizens have defensed the local post office by occupying space in front of it. We take the opportunity to serve the community by for example profering over three hundred free meals a week and providing crucial information. We have in fact become a community center and switch board.

 

I am an experienced facilitator, networker, articulate and understand finance and policy development. I bring to the table a demonstrated ability to form strategic partnerships between those of very diverse opinions.

My most recent accomplishment resulted in an extremely large coalition centered on creating a Tiny Homes Community here in Berkeley. This will result in ending homeless by the end of the year 2016.

 

 

 

 

  • Dan McMullen Commisioner Human Welfare and Community Action Commission
  • Paul Boden Western Regional Advocacy Project
  • Boona Cheema Community Advocate
  • Green Party of Alameda County
  • Mark Coplan Candidate for City Council District 3
  • Kelley Cutler Community Advocate
  • Sofia Hernandez Stillwater Vice-president of "Century of the Child".
  • Debby Charlene Segal Retired Civil Servant.
  • Mike Zint Co - Founder First They Came For The Homeless https://www.facebook.com/First-they-came-for-the-homeless-253882
  • Katy Blau, Homeless Advocate and Peer Educator"
1.
Question 1

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?

Answer from Guy "Mike" Lee:

Public Safety #1 priority - The overall crime rate in Berkeley is 51% higher then the national average. The main reason is we have police chasing homeless people.

Enforce Police Accountability – Racial profiling is a huge problem as documented by the National Lawyers Guild. It is my perception that a climate has been created which finds this behavior acceptable. I don't and will terminate anyone who practices this type of behavior.

Build Housing We Can All Afford – Current public policy is focused on building only luxary apartments. This is a dangerous and myopic policy which much be addressed now. The first step is ANY new development must get 80% approval from the immediate neighborhood before proceding.

End Homelessness Now! A Hand Up Not A Hand Out - The current system is broken, based on charity and not real solutions. Proven solutions that are employed in other cities are not even considered. There must be a community based response to homelessness that incorporates short,medium and long range goals.

Cal Students Deserve A Voice – Making up nearly 30% of the total population, paying aproxinmately $100,000 a month in sales tax they have no direct voice on City Council. This is unacceptable and its time to end taxation without representation

 Neighborhood Council- A Direct Path To Democracy is realized with the creation of neighborhood councils that are directly involved in setting public policy and keeping elected representatives accountable.

2.
Question 2

What do you consider the most important issue facing the city?

Answer from Guy "Mike" Lee:

Fiscal responsibility

Currently the City is one billion dollars in debt. The current proposed solution is to mitigate part of this by floating a bond i.e. borrow money. This ploicy of robbing Peter to pay Paul must stop

3.
Question 3

How do you plan to balance the regional Planned Bay Area (ABAG/MTC) goals of Priority Development Areas (PDAs) with local needs of property owners, traffic/parking/congestion problems, and other local concerns?

Answer from Guy "Mike" Lee:

I believe that we first need to summarize the goals of ABAG. We then need to take that summary into the community and solicit input from those whose quality of life is affected. At the end of the day if ABAG does not serve the needs of the community we may have to walk away

4.
Question 4

Considering the disintegration of local infrastructure, how can the city upgrade to meet the current regulatory requirements for clean air and for clean water discharge into the Bay?

Answer from Guy "Mike" Lee:

Fiscal responsibility and prioritization:

We must put the city squarely on the track of fiscal responsibility. No more discounts or rebates to developers. Every single expenditure must be performance based with a mechanisim of accountability attached to it. The days of simply handing out bags of money must stop.

Prioritization:

We are never going to have the entire amount we need to fix the infrastructure at one time. Thus we need to prioritize which projects get done first. My priorities are

1.) Repurpose old city hall using part of it to provide emergency shelter for the homeless giving them a place to rest instead of outside businesses

2.)  Veterans building relocate city services at least in part

3.)  Senior centers

Current environmental regulations are not enforced. Commisioner McMullen suggests deputizing volunteers to take up that role.

There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why... I dream of things that never were, and ask why not? Robert F. Kennedy

I am a moderate embracing the perspective and sentiment of Bobby Kennedy. My core belief is that of direct democracy in which the people themselves, rather than elected representatives, determine the laws and policies by which they are governed. As such I am the first candidate to advocate for the creation of neighborhood assemblies as the basis for crafting public policy. Many challenges face our small village. The only true way to resolve these obstacles is through community initiative

Unfortunately at present we have a non-responsive government. The only time we hear from them is when they appear on our doorstep begging for votes or money. Other then that our e-mails and phone calls are ignored. What is the direct result of this is that the city is currently one billion dollars in debt, rents have escalated out of control, crime is fifty- eight percent higher then the national average and homelessness has increased by fifty-three percent.

All of these issues can be solved when we as a community sit down at the kitchen table and exchange ideas and potential solutions.

To initiate a process of direct democracy I will have an open door policy. You come to the fifth floor someone will speak with you. Your phone calls and e-mails will be answered. The community will be continually apprised of events which may affect your quality of life through the use of community visits, face book, public access television and what ever means necessary to insure the voice of the community is heard.

As a former business owner I am a fiscal conservative. Currently the financial policy of the City can only be described as tax and spend. It has no idea of why its spending limited resources except that it sounds good or maybe it will result in a few more votes. This policy of fiscal irresponsibility can be seen in the following action taken by council. Despite being one billion dollars in debt they are advocating borrowing one hundred million dollars in the form of a bond measure. Their justification is that previous bonds are being paid off so it won't cost any more. I won't go into the math of why this is foolish but simply say this is nothing but robbing Peter to pay Paul. Another action which was taken by some of my opponets was to award thirteen million dollar tax rebate to a luxary hotel developer. They awarded zero to our police, fire fighters or teachers. Neither did residents of Berkeley get a piece of this action. We who have for years contribute to the City coffers on a daily basis didn't even get an ice cream cone! Debt sucks we all know that. As such the last thing you do to get out of debt is dig yourself deeper by borrowing more or just throw money away. We spend years paying off a mortgage and once we do our reaction is to do a happy dance not run and go back into hock. While those who currently ask for your vote can brag about how many years they have been around and all the wonderfull things they have done at the end of the day their hair brained schemes if continued will lead us all to ruination.

As a fiscal conservative I believe that every single dollar spent is not an expenditure it is an investment. As such I want to see what return we are going to receive. I'm also going to demand that all contracts be performance based. You either do the job you agree to do or don't get paid.

As a moderate my decisions will be made in the context of what is fair and just for the majority of the people. As a fiscal conservative the days of squandering precious resources, and maintaining a hostile climate for small business is over. For together we are going to build a future for our children and grandchildren. Together we are going to embrace A New Vision for A New Future.

 

 

Solving Homeless Immediately Homeless Senior Citizens

Summary

Seltering Homeless Senior Citizens

Homeless senior citizens are probably the most underserved segment of the homeless population. The Streets of Berkeley have become the new retirement home.

Due to age this population is very vunerable to life threatening sickness. Something as minor as a cold could lead to a painfull and slow death.

Many inhabit Berkeleys doorways due solely to the fact there is no housing available at a price they can afford. Obviously Council does not presently have the resources to house the entire population immediately. On the flip side of the coin neither can Council afford not to provide some type of shelter.

West Berkeley senior center is largely unused due to the fact financial resources are not available to maintain its operation as originally intended. The unused shelter should be converted to a year around shelter for 100 Senior citizens. During inclimate weather it can double as an emergency shelter at a minimal additional cost.

Liabilities

Staff

Two full time positions $60,000 (2 positions x $30,000 year = $60,000)

One part time position $30,000

Maintenance supplies $30,000

Total liabilities

$120,000 per year

$10,000 per month

$335.00 per day (Rounded up. based on $10,000 per month divided by 30 days in month)

$3.35 per resident per day ( based on 100 residents

In order to keep operation costs at a minimum residents are responsible for all maintenace chores. This is a system employed by Seattle Housing And Resource Effort

http://www.sharewheel.org/indoor-shelter-f-a-q-s)

All potential residents will be screened by the HUB. The Hub will maintain a day to day roster.

Residents are requiered to develop a plan of action and work with available case managers with the specific goal of attaining alternative housing.

In lieu of program participation resident may choose to pay one third of their monthly income.

Rules of conduct are very simple

No Drugs,alcohol or drug paraphernalia. If you show up intoxicated you will not be allowed into shelter.

Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. On site monitors will issue one warning and one warning only. Next incident means you leave for the night.

Increasing Public Safety without calling Batman and Robin

Summary

Crime in Berkeley is 58% higher then the national average. Here is the solution to addressing this issue

There is no arguing the fact that crime is out of control here in our fair city. Some sources have quoted at least 50% higher then the state average and others as high as 66%. Violent crime is at least 20% higher. It is my perspective that one of the contributing factors is the fact that public policy encourages law enforcement to chase homeless people instead of catching bad guys.
What is important is this doesn't seem to be a real concern of the current City  Council so it is now time for an organized community response.
What is proposed here is largely based on assumption. It also incorporates many years of personal observation and study. A lot of what is discussed here may or may not be in place. The purpose of this is simply to tender a possible solution and to act as a starting point of discussion. Of course we can always cross our fingers, call Batman and Robin then it will all magically go away.
A triangle is considered by many to be one of the most powerfull structures in the world. This is so because each side renforces the other and is applicable to anything you can concieve.
By refering to the graphic you can see I've overlaid a triangle on a voter precinct map.  I've establised and labeled three base points and connected the dots. At each basepoint is established either a formal substation or at the very least a mobile command center. To each are assigned ten patrol officers and two logisitics/dispatch officers for a total of twelve. Patrol area is divided into four blocks of ten with two officers assigned to each block. The two remaining consitute a flying squad assigned to patrol the entire fourty square blocks. They will respond to any situation as an immeadiate renforcement to first responders. At any given time there will be a patrol overlap between substations. This structure can be modified depending on patrol needs. By adding a  fourth substation at California and Sixty Second creates another triangle. What this system accomplishes is a focusing and efficient deployment of limited resources.
The real power of this strategy is realized with community involvement. Presently there are nummerous Neighborhood watch groups. It needs to be clearly understand what these groups need to operate better. Would it be usefull for instance to have bike patrols or walking beat officers? Direct communication to local substation/mobile command is another idea. What ever conclusion is arrived must originate from the community. For without their input any plan or scheme is doomed to fail. We are then left with two choices. Accept the escalating crime rate or call Batman and Robin.

Pathway To Democracy

Summary

The means and method to creating direct democracy resulting in the city's problems being solved

 

www.oldbumformayor.org

oldbumformayor@gmail.com

The inhabitants of our small village are looking for answers. They wonder why when walking down Shattuck out of every doorway peer a pair of eyes set in a haggard face. Why they ask themselves is rent so high and  crime rate spiraling out of control? Sitting at their kitchen table, bills spread out in front of them confused that taxes are becoming a worrisome burden. Village elders forced to decide whether to pay for prescriptions or rent. Food has already become a non-consideration. Monday through Friday lunch at the senior center. Hoping to get lucky and hit the Trader Joes lottery so they have a scrap of bread to eat during the weekend. A homeless wheelchair bound man sits not in a rocking chair on the porch but in Constitution square. Rain beats down on his hollow chest as he struggles vainly to get up the  hill towards emergency shelter. A vulnerable homeless woman wonders why this is happening to her as threadbare clothes are torn from her frail body to suffer once again hours if not days of physical abuse.

They all ask where are the village chiefs? They are nowhere to be found  Their looming presence can be felt. Like Rehoboam  making our yoke heavier, not lighter.  Instead of stone it is escalating rents and building housing that only a minority can afford. Scourging us with the whip of homelessness and misplaced priorities. 

 

The present social order which we all participate in is administered by representative democracy.  Allowing  a small group of people to run things for us in our behalf. A best case scenario is we then hold them accountable for their actions.

 

How is it we hold them accountable? Well every once in a while we get to vote them off the island. If you have time and energy to trudge down to  weekly council meeting the Chiefs awards us a grand privilege of blathering for two minutes. That is if the Grand Poobah sitting center stage decides we deserve such a blessing. Ah but if lots of villagers want to speak our time gets cut to 60 seconds. Doesn’t matter if people are dying in the streets, sidewalks need fixing or you just saw the cow jump over the moon.

 

On a day to day basis we are held powerless by representative democracy. Is that really true? 

I'll concede the fact that it may be necessary for one person to represent the interests of thousands. How this is possible is a mystery to me but I’ll go along with the program. At its core the system only works if we hold our representative accountable. Under the present system that is next to impossible. 

 

Government is not supposed to be in charge or in control of your giving or your desire to help your fellow settler.

Instead of people wandering around with their hands out looking for the government to do things for them, they should instead consider what they, personally, can do for the individuals in their community, nation (and the world). The problem comes when people start to think the government should dictate who is helped, how they are helped, and how much of YOUR money is used to help. Serious problems arise when we acquiesce to the Chiefs. 

To correct this what I envision is a federation of neighborhood groups directly involved in setting public policy and holding elected representatives accountable.

It starts from the ground. I can see 10 participants per block who go door to door asking for participants. As more and more become involved a neighborhood council is formed. Subsequently a district council. 

A practical example is Susan is very concerned about the sidewalk in front of her house. So much so she mentions it to Bob who agrees. They gather more of their neighbors and form a council. They then approach their City Council member who can't be found but they do get an e mail full of platitudes At the end of the day it just means go away and don't bother me.

As a result Susan,Bob and all participants decide to fix it themselves so Max a wheelchair bound veteran can get to Berkeley bowl. 

It doesn’t matter what the topic is the community now has a conveyance to solve any problems and bring innovative ideas to the table of common discussion. This configuration results in elected City Council member being transformed into a facilitator. Thus the community exerts direct control over the council. We no longer have one person doing for all of us for we are Doing It Ourselves.

What is needed today is A New Vision For A New Future. A vision which has as its cornerstone the understanding that the individual can only survive and prosper is if the collective body does. Focused on creating a more egalitarian and participatory process based on not coercion or wishful thinking but voluntary cooperation. Only until we as individuals truly believe that we as a community can move mountains together will the challenges that face all of us be confronted in a meaning

ful and effective way. This is the pathway to true and direct democracy.

 

Nuts and Bolts - How It Works

This idea is based on the number of 10.  10 to form any one element.

To further this idea I will walk the streets with interested parties. Not only that each 10 x 10 formed will receive $100.00 seed money from City coffers and an additional $100.00 matching grant. 

Upon formation of neighborhood council the city will sponsor a block party cost caped at $500.00. The city will provide $500.00 seed money and $500.00 matching grant. 

Upon formation of district council city will host a block party cost caped at $1,000.00. The city will provide $1,000.00 seed money and $1,000.00 matching grant.

 

CalTV News sits down with  Michael Lee to talk about his campaign for Mayor of Berkeley. 

— September 14, 2016 East Bay Media Center - oldbumformayor - Lee-2016

Pratical demonstration of how the community can solve its own problems

— September 14, 2016 East Bay Media Center - oldbumformayor - Lee-2016

Firebrand Mike Lee address community on the state of the City

— September 14, 2016 Mike Zint

Funny and cutting edge Mike speaks about his experience as a defender of Berkeley's post office, Liberty City and his campaign

Retired Assistant Administrator
0 votes (0.6%)
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  • Berkeley's Seniors Concerns
  • Addressing Mental and Homelessne
  • Fair Housing
Profession:Retired Assistant Administrator
Assistant Administrator, The Milton and Della Pete Residential Board and Care Facility/For Developmentally Disabled Adults and Elderly (19722000)
Teletype Operator, Western Union (19611971)
SanJose State Univ and San Jose City College none, Business Management (1961)
Berkeley High School, Berkeley California High School Diploma, Business (1958)
Member, Black Baptist Church located in Bay Area (1945current)

Born in Pittsburg, Texas, second child born to Milton and Della Pete. Parents brought my brother (who is deceased Jan 2014) and me to California at a early age. I was three. Lived few years in Oakland California. We moved to Berkeley California in 1952. My parents liked the Berkeley school system. Attended all of Berkeley public schools, graduated from Berkeley High at the age of 17. Had some college experience, even though I never finished any college to earn a degree, I did go  to work over the years. I was a Teletypist for a Telegraph Co for 10 years, and worked for my parents as Assistant Administrator at my parents owned and operated Residential Care Facility, named The Pete Residential Board and Care Home. My mother was the main force behind the operating of the facility, she was a LVN. My dad also was a main force, because he was a carpenter, he saw that the place was build to standard, and also took part being administrator together with my mother. At first the facility cared for the Elderly, then it went to caring for Developmentally Disabled Adult Clients. I worked there for about 28 years,1972 - 2000. I have never held a public office , but ran for Berkeley City Council 1979 and 1984. Ran for Mayor in Berkeley 1982 and 1986. Now here I am again running in 2016. I have no big name endorsers, nor any big contributions. What little money I did receive, I spent it downtown Berkeley at local printing shop. The people, who were kind enough to me to sign so I could qualify for the ballot is who I owe graditude to. Making Berkley the Best City iin the State of California and the USA is my goal.

  • None
1.
Question 1

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?

Answer from Naomi D. Pete:

I would like to see Berkeley have a better image. We should want this city to welcome visitors in a way that they will want to visit Berkeley over and over.  We must protect and respect our Seniors , and all our Berkeley citizens. And we must be concerned about what Seniors want for the city. Berkeley young people should be a part of making the policies for their City. I want all of Berkeley areas to be recognized, not just downtown Berkeley. Pending issues should be taken care of quickly, and issues that are not working for the City should be left alone. I want to be on good terms with our police department, hoping to achieve, by working together, create a strong bond. Therefore, not causing confusion, and unkindness between all of us. A Mayor should set the tone, not only with their personality, which should be uplifting, and encouraging, but also respectful. The Best for Berkeley is what we need now.

2.
Question 2

What do you consider the most important issue facing the city?

Answer from Naomi D. Pete:

Mental and Homelessness in the streets of Berkeley. I say this, because, mental people are approaching other people on the streets, some all at once. Some people hollering at other people like themselves, or hollering at the wind. Quite frightning. I understand that people are being sent to Berkeley from other cities, when those cities should be taking care of the problem themselves. I feel for little children, who have to see all of these things. I be wondering how they feel. Surely, this City needs to really put their heads together on this issue.

3.
Question 3

How do you plan to balance the regional Planned Bay Area (ABAG/MTC) goals of Priority Development Areas (PDAs) with local needs of property owners, traffic/parking/congestion problems, and other local concerns?

Answer from Naomi D. Pete:

I dont"t know much about this issue. All I can say is that, I hope there would be fair dealing here. Because all of the City and it"s residents are part of these things. Not just special interest for a few. With good, fair, dealings and respectfulness, I am sure there is a solutions for this issue.

4.
Question 4

Considering the disintegration of local infrastructure, how can the city upgrade to meet the current regulatory requirements for clean air and for clean water discharge into the Bay?

Answer from Naomi D. Pete:

I don't know. I am not familiar with this issue, even though, I am reading upon it, so I can understand what does anybody who knows more about this would recommend what to do.

I think the public officials should be responsible and respectful servants. Working together with kindness toward not only each other, but other departments that make up the city profile. Being concerned for all of the city not just part of the city. Helping residents and citizens if we can help. I believe in voting and everybody should take part in voting. You should always vote your own conscience, and what relates and work best for you with different issues. Other people should run for office, like me, an outsider, a woman, and I just happen to be a Black American/African American woman. More woman like me should run, especially you younger ones. Good images are good for making a healthy city. Politicians should be good images not a burden or disgrace to the city.

Email naomipete4@gmail.com

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Forum for the candidates for Mayor of Berkeley, CA — October 10, 2016 League of Women Voters

Forum for the candidates for Mayor of Berkeley, CA, 2016

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