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School Director —Berkeley Unified School DistrictNovember 8, 2016 —California General Election

School
November 8, 2016 —California General Election

Berkeley Unified School DistrictSchool Director

Election Results

  • 100% of precincts reporting (108/108).

About this office

Members establish educational goals and standards, approve curricula and the district’s budget, approve various purchases and renovations, and appoint the superintendent of schools.
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Berkeley School Board Director
39,461 votes (50.6%)Winning
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  • Achieve equity in education for all students
  • Foster positive school climates that support student success
  • Align spending with district goals
Profession:Incumbent, Berkeley School Board, Attorney, Non-profit executive director

After graduating from UC Santa Cruz with a BA in environmental studies, I was invited to join a field study in Costa Rica focusing on insect-plant interactions. I spent the next four years in Central America, working on projects that focused on alternatives to pesticide use and sustainable agriculture. Working with indigenous and rural agrarian communities to implement alternatives to pesticides taught me so much not only about sustainable environmental practices, but also about listening, organizing, and the power of community.

 

Our democracy relies on civic involvement - I believe it will require all of our commitment if we are to become the society we believe in. After returning to the Bay Area to attend the Hastings/UC Berkeley joint degree program in Law and City and Regional Planning, I was immediately struck by the glaring injustice of chronic homelessness, and homeless advocacy became a major focus. I was awarded a National Association for Public Interest Equal Justice Fellowship, which allowed me to develop a civil rights position with the San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness, integrating legal strategies in a grassroots organization. In addition to my work at the Coalition, I helped create and then served on the Board of Directors of the Community Housing Partnership, which builds and manages both supported and independent housing for formerly homeless people.

 

Through my work on homeless advocacy, I also became involved in criminal justice reform and governmental transparency, serving on the Board of Directors of Ella Baker Center, National Lawyer’s Guild, Media Alliance and the San Francisco Sunshine Ordinance Task Force.

 

As my life continued to evolve, I became intimately aware of the challenges facing the LGBT community. My partner, Alison Bernstein and I were early leaders in the gay marriage movement, getting married (for the first time) in 1996, again in 2004 when Mayor Newsom legalized gay marriage, and finally in 2013, during the Prop 8 “window”. When we had our kids, we also joined the growing movement to win equality for our families, pushing for inclusion in our schools and social welfare programs.

 

After receiving my J.D., I worked for ten years as a civil rights attorney, first at the Coalition on Homelessness, and then at the Drug Policy Alliance. At the Coalition, I was involved in both direct advocacy as well as impact litigation, working closely with the Northern California ACLU, the Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights and private law firms to afford the poorest and most desperate among us their basic civil rights. At the Drug Policy Alliance, my focus was on reducing the harm caused by drug enforcement policies aimed at communities of color, and in particular women.

 

I have spent over a decade supporting LGBTQ families as the Executive Director of Our Family Coalition. Under my leadership, OFC worked throughout California to create LGBTQ-welcoming and inclusive schools, introducing the Welcoming Schools guide so that schools are safe for all children. We support parents/caregivers and their children through over 150 events each year. One of the events that I am most proud of is our annual LGBTQ family night at the Berkeley Downtown YMCA, which just celebrated its 18th year.

 

I have been deeply involved in the implementation of the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful Education Act, which updates the educational guidelines to ensure that LGBT people are included in a fair and accurate way in our teaching of history and social movements. This, along with our work in elementary schools, helps make safer learning environments for queer youth. By normalizing the contributions of LGBTQ people in the history of our state, country and the world, the FAIR Education Act will play a critical role in ending stigma and creating a more equitable world.

 

Over the past three years we have also been involved in several important pieces of legislation that impact LGBT people and families. OFC sponsored the Modern Family Act (making it easier and less expensive for gays and lesbians to adopt), a bill paving the way for secured parental rights with home insemination, and a bill that requires the collection of data on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in four large statewide departments. I am committed not only to help pass good laws, but to doing what I can to make sure that they are fully and fairly implemented.

 

Educational equity has become my passion, and I am now bringing my skills to help further school-based health as the Executive Director of the California School-Based Health Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and academic success of children and youth by advancing school-based health care. I am proud to play a role in working toward a future when all students have access to the health services they need to be successful in school. School-based health care includes programs such as school-based health centers (SBHCs), mental health services, dental programs, school nursing, and mobile programs, all critical for the well-being of our students.

 

My life’s work reflects not only my commitment to creating a more just and equitable society, but my willingness to stand up for those who frequently have no voice. Whether it is fighting to protect the rights of the poorest in our streets or supporting the rights of all LGBTQ people to create families, I will bring all I have to the fight to ensure that rights are protected and each and every one of us is given an opportunity to grow and thrive.

 

 

As a member of the Berkeley School Board, I have been honored to serve this community and to work with the community to find smart, innovative and effective approaches to the daunting task of educating our diverse student body for the challenges of the 21st century.

   

 

 

Every child deserves the opportunity to be seen, valued and challenged at school. This simple goal is a hallmark of a just and equitable society, the kind of society I have been working to create for the last thirty years - as an activist, civil rights attorney, executive director, social justice leader, elected official and the proud parent of two BUSD students. It has been an honor for me to serve on the Berkeley School Board for the past four years, where I have been driven by my belief in our students and my deep commitment to ensuring that every one of them has access to a quality education and appropriate resources, particularly those students who are struggling. While we have accomplished a great deal as a board, I recognize there is still much to do, and I am eager for the opportunity to continue our good work.

 

Being an effective school board trustee requires an understanding of the overarching challenges facing our schools, and some real insights into how to bring  people together to further examine and  define those challenges and, based on that deeper understanding, develop smart and innovative solutions.  I  believe I have those skills, and have already begun the work off better defining our problems and identifying and implementing real solutions.

 

ACHIEVE EQUITY IN EDUCATION FOR ALL STUDENTS

Berkeley Unified School District has been making real strides in closing the opportunity gap through a combination of academic interventions, coordination of services, intentional staff training, and implementation of research-validated equity strategies for the classroom.

 

We need to continue to deepen these efforts so that we can close the racial predictability of academic achievement while creating learning environments that challenge all of our students.

 

ALIGN SPENDING WITH DISTRICT GOALS

We owe it to our children and our community to make sure that we are spending district resources to attain the best outcomes for our students. We have done an excellent job of this, with our credit ratings reaching a new high this year.

I will continue to be a vigilant steward of our resources, making sure to allocate them to those programs and systems that best support our students. We must continue to align our spending strategically with our district goals

 

FOSTER POSITIVE SCHOOL CLIMATES THAT SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS

Our students need to feel connected to the adults in their school, and safe expressing themselves for who they are in order to succeed not just in school, but in the life that follows. This is an area where I have taken a lead over the past four years. Positive school climates allow children to learn and give teachers the opportunity to teach.

We will achieve this through the implementation of our new Restorative Practices plan, the expansion of our social emotional learning program, Toolbox, and increased intervention counseling and mental health supports.

 

STRENGTHEN TIES BETWEEN SCHOOL, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY

Our schools must create opportunities for all parents and caregivers to engage in their children's education. The involvement of parents and caregivers in their children's learning is an essential ingredient to students' success.

Our world-class community resources – higher education, service agencies and business – must be leveraged to enrich our students’ learning.

 

This year there are a myriad of critical local measures that we face as voters. Measure E1, which funds the the Berkeley Schools Excellence Program (BSEP) is critically important to our schools. As a community response to school funding shortages in the wake of Proposition 13, this local tax measure has made a huge difference in the quality of our children’s education for the past 30 years.  BSEP pays for almost one in three Berkeley teachers to ensure small class sizes, funds all of our school libraries and library staff, funds the music program for grades 4 through 8, provides programs to support struggling students, and much more.

 

Please vote Yes on E1!!!

 

 

 
Incumbent
30,116 votes (38.61%)Winning
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  • Amplifying a district-wide positive message and expectation of equity and excellence for ALL of our students
  • Supporting alternatives to suspensions and expulsions with programs like Restorative Justice, early identification of students who are struggling academically and socially; and providing appropriate and culturally responsive intervention.
  • Continuing to support professional learning communities for our teachers; and training and career pathways for our classified staff.
Profession:By profession, I am an educator and administrator in early to school age care and education with 36+ years experience.
Executive Director, Bay Area Hispano Institute for Advancement, Inc. (BAHIA) (1980–current)
School Board Director, Berkeley Unified School District — Elected position (2008–current)
CA School Board Association Appointee Committee Member, Transitional Kindergarten Steering Committee — Appointed position (2016–current)
Alameda County Delegate, School Board Delegate — Elected position (2015–current)
Pacific Oaks College Master's in Leadership in Education , Bilingual Edcuation, Equity, Leadership, Early to School Age Care and Education, Administration (2000)
San Francisco State University BA in La Raza Studies, Study of Latino education, culture, history and politics (1979)
Co-Chair, Chicana Latina Foundation (2000–current)
Advisory Board Member, Somos Familia (2010–current)

As a lifelong bilingual educator and two term School Board Director I have demonstrated a sincere commitment to academic excellence based upon equitable opportunities for all of our students. In my almost eight years as School Board Director I have consistently voted to support professional development; focus on attendance and chronic absence of our students by engaging all partners to reach out to students and families in a restorative not punitive fashion; and work to continue a stronger focus on strengthening and welcoming parent engagement in our schools; and ensure that our schools are serving supporting the learning of English Language Learners through a Master Plan that outlines our specific programs and practices and how district-wide they should be implemented. We have made important gains in addressing the acheivement gap with African American and Latino students graduating from high school in higher percentages than the statewide overall average for all ethnicities-and have continued to increase the number of students taking advance level classes and being eligible for four year colleges. If re-elected I will continue to be committed to ensuring that all students have equal opportunity to acheive their full potential in our schools.

  • Alameda Labor Council
  • Berkeley Democratic Club
  • Berkeley Federation of Teachers+
  • Berkeley City Councilmembers (ALL)
  • Berkeley School Board (ALL)
  • John George Democratic Club
1.
School Spending

A recent law made major changes in the way that the state allocates funding to schools.  What will you do to ensure that the public understands your local control formula for school spending and your plan to measure outcomes?

Answer from Beatriz Leyva-Cutler:

.

BAHIA's programs have a Parent Advisory Board (PAC) that makes recommendations, questions and provides feedback to the Local Control Formula; they are parents and community members that are trained and provided resources to questions and being able to answer how we know what we know? In our programs at BAHIA, we provide the training, consultation with staff about qualificaiton and experience.

The board, staff and the school board work collaborative with the Superintendent to ensure our LCAP for school spending and that BUSD is meeting our measured outcomes, by survey re determine parent satisfaction from our parents and staff, going to where parents and community exist; and ask them what they think, and ensuring our Chief Finance Director, Javetta Cleaveland knows the nuances of an old house rebuilt.   

 

1.
Question 1

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?

Answer from Beatriz Leyva-Cutler:

 

If elected I would like to achieve that our Berkeley Unified School District would have 100% measurable gains in student’s graduated college and career ready, our policies and practices would be aligned to equity and excellence. Our taxpayers would have approved measure E1 to continue supporting class size reduction, libraries, technology in our schools, visual arts and arts in the classroom, counselors, professional development for our teachers and parent engagement. If elected, I will keep the lens of equity, excellence and children excited about learning every day at the forefront of my role and responsibility as a school board director.

 

2.
Question 2

What would you do to address challenges such as the following?

  • funding and registration; teacher retention and compensation
  • safety; bullying and sexual harassment
  • college and vocational readiness; creating pathways for those who are not college bound
Answer from Beatriz Leyva-Cutler:

 

Implementing with fidelity the Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) Evaluating on a rubric the LCAP for its effectiveness and its implementation with fidelity along with the Common Core in Math and English Language Arts.

 

Work with staff to ensure students are on track at the 9th, 10th and 11th grade for college and/or career.

 

Work hard between now and November 8th to ensure voters pass measure E1 for our schools. Failure to pass will result in devastating cuts, reductions of programs and the progress we have made in several of our schools.

 

 

I am fortunate because in my career I have seen and learned what children need from zero to young adulthood. First and foremost children need to be raised in healthy environments with caregiving/parents/adults and community that provide children with safety, love, their identity and a trust; and an unconditional love that has limits, yet teaches children to safe, healthy and compassionate. The early years are very important and being present as a parent/caregiver, talking/reading and engaging children every day is as important as them feeling responsible and part of a family and a community, giving children simple to complex responsibilities in the home from how they welcome and engage with family, friends and neighbors to how they take care and look out for siblings, cousins and friends and their community. If you provide children with this safe loving and caring family learning happens for children. When children do not have this in their lives early on - they will be constantly searching for safety, be protective of themselves and what few family, friends and things they have. These children will need adults in their lives to really see them, and be constant in their lives to regain the early trust they did not receive. Many children grow up without shelter/food, but have received this strong love and nurturance from their parents and they have managed to survive and succeed. Children who have shelter/food and no love and nurturance in their home - will have challenges emotionally and socially. It is incumbent on adults to be constantly mindful and educated (based on life experience and/or formal education) on what foundation children need to grow to be healthy global citizens that we will need in the future, in our society and in our communities. We are all responsible for children learning to be healthy adults, that's why public education matters.

 

Scientist/Entrepreneur
8,032 votes (10.3%)
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  • Priority to special need students
  • Strong community involvement
  • Efficient uses of resources
Profession:Scientist/Entrepreneur
The University of Sydney Ph.D, BIOINFORMATICS (2007)

Dr. Sikder was born in Barisal, Bangladesh. He has his Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. He also have a Masters degree in IT and a PhD in IT from The University Of Sydney, Australia. He studied in the University of California San Diego as a PhD student (EAP).He is the Founder & CEO of Sikder Institute (nonprofit for research & Training) and Bay Tax (An IT and Tax Consulting firm). He worked as  a Scientist and a Software Engineer in various organization in New Zealand, Australia, Bangladesh and USA.

Dr. Sikder was the secretary of waikato ethnic council, Hamilton , New Zealand. He was the secretary of Campbelltown Bangla School, NSW, AUSTRALIA. He is a member of Bangladeshi American Democratic Coalition, Berkeley Democratic Club and IEEE.

Email abdursikder1@gmail.com
Activist, Realtor
Write-In
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  • Let the community announce its dissatisfaction with this structure, school, attempting to supplant it with the pleasant alternatives.
  • Let the community identify the far reaching changes that must accompany the goal to eliminate the system that daily commits unacceptable and painful indoctrination on children and adults, alike.
  • Let communities come out from under the bullying tactics embedded in school, that fit us into serving this system that enriches those few, that .1%, destroying our beloved Earth.
Profession:Activist, Realtor
Realtor, self (1987–current)
State Central Committee Member, Peace and Freedom Party — Elected position (2000–current)
County of Alameda Central Committee, Peace and Freedom Party — Elected position (2000–current)
Electronics tech, small, experimental firm in Emeryville (1979–1980)
Electronics technician, Pacific Bell Telephone Co. (1978–1979)
Electronics technician, Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (1976–1978)
Electronics technician journey-person, Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (1973–1976)
Roosevelt University, Chicago. B.A., 'education' (1963)
volunteer, Peace and Freedom Party (2000–current)
Volunteer, community food buying club (1972–1977)

My Communist father and my mother owned a grocery store.  I clerked there.  I worked in offices.  I married, later bore a child; he, his wife and children have moved around, now live in New Orleans. Later I bore a daughter.  She lives in South San Francisco.  I taught school in the U.S. and Israel.  I've been politically active as long as I've been able.  I supported Henry Wallace, then Vincent Hallinan for President as a member of Young Progressives, a result of McCarthy.  Then Chicago, my hometown, was for me a political desert until SANE nuclear policy and anti-war demonstrations in the 50s and 60s.  I tried to emigrate to Israel to help build the socialist-based nation for 10 months in '65-'66.  I went West to take my daughter to be schooled in ' the revolution', Berkeley, in '72

1.
School Spending

A recent law made major changes in the way that the state allocates funding to schools.  What will you do to ensure that the public understands your local control formula for school spending and your plan to measure outcomes?

Answer from Norma J F Harrison:

 

I'd consult with other office holders before I start trying to work this out.  But I suspect the demands are counter our need to do work that is good for us all and instead furthers the demands I oppose - 'hard' work to maintain the present terribly abusive system. It is reasonable to expect a comfortable, meaningful life instead of one lived under pressure to perform, subject to excessive meaningless 'evaluations'.  Since learning and teaching can arise relative to circumstances rather than according to the insubstantial schedules school imposes on teachers and students alike, detailed planning 5 months into the future rather than responding to circumstances life brings is discouraging - discourages that gold goal, creative thinking.  A person/people could think of an activity wholly out of the planned schedule - a desirable activity - that can't be done because the one planned for that time must be done instead.  

 

Preposterous.

 

Tests must be people's evaluation all along the way of doing what they do.  That means seeing what one has done and figuring out whether that is what was desired or not, and fixing it if not.

 

Obviously it is just that kind of regulation of funding to schools that we have to tackle so, just as we ask for judicial control of sentencing, we ask for control over our lives together to teach and study in order to serve our individual and communal interests.

Likely it would take a while for the public to understand education in our own interests, rather than in the interests of a state designed, as this one is, to support our Owners' interests.  However, since they'd be part of who is acting, having eradicated age segregation, they'd understand and perceive the goals we fought for as being desirable and beneficial.

1.
Question 1

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?

Answer from Norma J F Harrison:

 

Classroom-like study needs to rise in situ.  All the skills can be learned doing our work together, not isolated into 8-, 10 years of unlearning how to read, write, calculate.  Learning the skills has been cast as needing remediation, instead of happening as the natural accompaniment of any study and work.

 

          Teaching and learning needs instead to become us working together regardless of age, altogether because of communal and individual need and desire.  Work needs to become for all OUR benefit, none for our Owners, the profiteers.

 

          I offer the opportunity to enable the discussion of how to remove the present binding form and replace it with the living that will allow us all the joy! of education, the joy of work, of actually participating within our communities, not requiring our children to accept the deception that school equals work.

2.
Question 2

What would you do to address challenges such as the following?

  • funding and registration; teacher retention and compensation
  • safety; bullying and sexual harassment
  • college and vocational readiness; creating pathways for those who are not college bound
Answer from Norma J F Harrison:

 

 This social structure makes destructive demands on children and their communities.  People don’t need to prepare for college/vocational readiness.  People who participate as productive members of society,  of their community, from their earliest days become more and more aware of their capabilities, their tastes for activities, their involvement in maintaining the community and themselves, and their interest in becoming skilled in and knowledgeable about their activities.  They see the value to themselves as well as to the community, of their work, their activities.

 

College and vocational preparedness are necessary for people who have existed outside the mainstream for their lives until the time to prepare to study to participate, instead of participating their whole lives.  Meanwhile, a work force has been doing distasteful work, or, if not distasteful, then in uncomfortable conditions – 8hour days, away from friends and loved ones, meeting demands that are excessive in their structure, instead of cooperative and relevant to one’s own life and community.  Often the immediate surroundings are dangerous, unpleasant.

 

You know what I mean.  We make inordinate concessions to keep the job, because we need it – the job.

 

Living a satisfying life from – oh – I dunno – age 2, participating as a member of the community, obviates bullying; as well, it eliminates crime – street crime.  And it certainly is done in a structure in which there is no boardroom crime, capitalism having been overthrown in favor of the structure that lets us all care for us all and ourselves, not caring for maintenance of The Rich.

The interim actions say to maintain teacher retention and all the other miserable goals in this social structure will have to become anathema instead of continue to be accepted.  Our communal and individual health depend on it.

I thought for the longest time that Jewish Communist was what we all were - well really, all people were - Communist - if not Jewish.  I've spent my lifetime furthering my Utopian idealism. When you read my statement you'll see I know we're all geniuses, we're all - almost all – good.  We need to create the society that permits that – us all to be good.  Capitalism, like monarchy, suppresses our genius and our goodness.  School enables that suppression dividing children into successful, mediocre, and unsuccessful.  It creates angry frustrated people who are to fit into the permitted, wearing jobs, that increase our frustration, anger, and failure.  If people are successful it's mainly to the degree they-we can deal with the constraint that is living in this society,  which is ONLY all about maintaining our Owners, our Rich, our Rulers. 

I see it is necessary for us to affirm together that that is the structure of the society we now live in, to recognize its abusiveness, and to formulate the understanding of the social structure through which we can all live comfortably, securely, satisfactorily – even joyously, with joy in our work study relaxation recreation maintenance and all.

 

It is necessary to counter the insistence that things are improving.

Summary

Things are staying the same for students and communities.  Difficulties remain.  They cannot be modified/reformed/repaired/remediated in the present social structure.  All experience the bullying and disorder this structure naturally gives rise to.

 

Administration's view is narrow, suffers from blinders worn because of the necessity felt to push on regardless the centuries of, again, bullying school does in order to create that stream of bowed headed workers.  The necessity comes from needing a job - a job teaching, clerking, janitor-ing, administering in the school and in the Board offices.

 

 

WRITE IN     Norma J F Harrison for Berkeley School Board Director

 

I have studied ‘education’ for 70 years.  I’ve seen over and over the futility of the constant, always unsuccessful reform efforts.  We’re still left with school.  The reforms do not, cannot! begin to rectify the inadequacy that school is, the role it plays in our singly-minded society directed at continuing our Owners’ profiteering by our labor.

 

The problem is school itself.

 

I tell people ‘we hate school’; we the faculty, staff, parents, communities … and students.  Most people wholeheartedly agree.   Some guarantee ‘I loved it’!  I guarantee they – as do we all – experience selective amnesia, forgetting the treacheries, unceasing, which they set aside in order to get on with life as permitted.  As with jobs, we all accustom ourselves more or less, to our day to day life. We have to accept what’s permitted in order to survive, however wearing or boring or limiting the assignment is.  The few of us who’re fortunate enough to have jobs we like, that make sense, are subject to numerous undesirable conditions likely including having to spend too much time there.

 

School is to repair us.  Its approach is that we’re insufficient, in error; it’s supposed to remediate that.  That’s the opposite of ‘educe’, the root of ‘education’.  ‘Educe’ means that who comes has content, thinks creatively – as we all do, from the time we’re born.  Instead we’re approached as though we need to be taught to think creatively.  The attitude instead is that if the student doesn’t agree with the content, they’re not creatively thinking.

 

The fact is, we’re all geniuses. Genius is not a genetic factor, hovering parents trying to be sure their child gets a good job, to the contrary. 

 

We’re all artists.

 

We’re all teachers and students all our lives.

 

Alienation is defined by our not being permitted to engage our tastes and tendencies.  These are stifled by the insistence that we fill classrooms and school desks and offices, instead; that we must be diploma-ed, degree-ed, in order to get some prestige that allows us – maybe! – to get some good position, which is not like changing the street lights’ light bulbs (an esSENtial task! relegated to lesser status!).

 

People have long known that a four-hour work week overproduces what we need and like, if the full labor force, that’s everyone, all of us, regardless of age, is permitted to participate in production.  Participation in production is what orients us into our communities and into understanding our place in life.  It includes feeling around for what to do – together – or alone. It imbues us with self-respect.

 

Instead we have to accept what’s permitted in order to survive, including that our Owners bomb us – near and far; including that we resist, yet end up fitting ourselves into the imperium.

 

          The artificiality of school lessons, classes, is felt as insults by all concerned: students, teachers, and their families and communities, by forcing age-segregated routinization formations in place of self-respecting participation in society.  Common Core notwithstanding (same ol’), the classroom presupposes students’ interests, and their abilities.  Teachers are to tell themselves as well as the subjects, students and parents, that the lessons are relevant for them, whether they are or not; that the lessons are time-appropriate – in that students’ life, whether the student wants to study that lesson then or not.   

 

          Lessons are externally imposed classroom requirements; – classrooms created as a place for teachers and staff to earn a living, and for children to be warehoused as labor waiting until some artificially determined time to become a full participant in society.

 

          These deformities have to come under discussion in order for us to begin to grasp together, the direction in which our struggle needs to go.

 

          Continually expecting that the major aid to our oppression, school, be made useful, has got to be available for discussion; that, and what the choices need to become. 

 

          The choice obviously is us all doing our lives together. Don’t let the system rip our children from us in order to use the formal stamping machine to fit them into it.  Don’t let the system force children to be made to believe that school equals work.  Don’t make people pretend to do the hammering and sawing of living, cutting milk cartons into house-shapes for some project. Let us ALL DO real work together. 

 

No failure. 

 

No tests in anything like the present form.

 

Classroom-like study needs to rise in situ.  All the skills can be learned doing our work together, not isolated into 8-, 10 years of unlearning how to read, write, calculate.  Learning the skills has been cast as needing remediation, instead of happening as the natural accompaniment of any study and work.

 

          Teaching and learning needs instead to become us working together regardless of age, altogether because of communal and individual need and desire.  Work needs to become for all OUR benefit, none for our Owners, the profiteers.

 

          I offer the opportunity to enable the discussion of how to remove the present binding form and replace it with the living that will allow us all the joy! of education, the joy of work, of actually participating within our communities, not requiring our children to accept the deception that school equals work.

 

Read: School Is The Opposite Of Education, a study to release us from our confinement, by Norma J F Harrison, http://njfhar.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/table-of-contents

 

 

  Alameda County and State of California Peace and Freedom Party Central Committees member 

 

I have completed submission of the necessary write-in candidate papers. 

 

Norma J F Harrison    1312 Cornell Ave.    Berkeley, ca. 94702   510 526-3968

 

Videos

Berkeley School Director candidates forum — September 23, 2016 League of Women Voters

Video of the forum for candidates for School Director, Berkeley Unified School District, held 9/13/16

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